Evaluation of Anthropometric and Cardiometabolic Indices in Professional Drivers

Abstract

Background: Professional drivers are populations that are exposed to a sedentary lifestyle. A sedentary lifestyle can cause anthropometric, metabolic, and cardiological disorders in individuals. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the anthropometric and cardiometabolic disorders in professional drivers in Shahroud.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 984 professional drivers (who drove more than 8 hours a day) in Shahroud in 2020. Required information includes metabolic factors (LDL, HDL, cholesterol, fasting blood sugar, and blood pressure) and anthropometric factors (BMI, Waist circumference, Hip Circumference, and Wrist Circumference) extracted from their health records.

Results: In professional drivers, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was 41.6% and 18.9%, respectively. 77.8% had abnormal waist circumference, 3.8% had FBS≥126 mg/dl, 32.8% had LDL more than 130 mg/dl, 31.7% Cholesterol more than 200 mg/dl and 81.8% drivers had HDL less than 45 mg/dl. The mean level of cardiometabolic factors such as SBP, DBP, FBS, and cholesterol was 132.20, 80.56, 97.13, and 190.35, respectively. Also, from view point of anthropometric indices, the average weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, wrist circumference, and BMI was 80.22, 98.59, 103.30, 18.21, and 27.02, respectively.

Conclusions:  According to the findings, professional drivers are exposed to cardiometabolic risk factors including FBS, cholesterol, LDL, and blood pressure, as well as anthropometric disorders including increased body mass index, weight, waist circumference, and hip circumference.

Published
Oct 11, 2022
How to Cite
DALIRI 1, Salman et al. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Cardiometabolic Indices in Professional Drivers. International Journal of Health Studies, [S.l.], oct. 2022. ISSN 2423-6594. Available at: <https://ijhs.shmu.ac.ir/index.php/ijhs/article/view/1001>. Date accessed: 04 dec. 2022. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.22100/ijhs.v9i2.1001.
Issue
Section
Articles